May 21, 2024

SEC to investigate Boeing over statements on safety practices: report


The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has opened an investigation into Arlington, Virginia-based Boeing Co. for statements the corporate made concerning safety practices, following an incident the place a panel blew off an Alaska Airlines 737 Max 9 16,000 toes above Oregon in January.

Reuters reported that the SEC investigation will look into whether or not Boeing or its executives made statements deceptive buyers, in accordance to a report from Bloomberg News, primarily based on three sources aware of the event.

Boeing declined to remark on the matter when Fox News Digital reached out to the corporate, whereas the SEC didn’t reply to requests for remark.

In January, a 737 Max 9 operated by Alaska Airlines was flying 16,000 toes above Oregon when a panel plugging the house reserved for an unused emergency door blew off the jetliner. Though pilots had been in a position to land the Boeing 737 Max 9 safely, points surrounding the aircraft got here crashing down on the plane’s producer.

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Employees work on Boeing 737 Max airplanes at the Boeing Renton Factory in Renton, Washington on March 27, 2019.

Employees work on Boeing 737 Max airplanes on the Boeing Renton Factory in Renton, Wash., on March 27, 2019. (Jason Redmond/AFP by way of Getty Images / Getty Images)

In March, the Department of Justice opened a prison investigation into the incident.

The FBI additionally started notifying passengers that they could be a “possible victim of a crime.” 

Boeing recently failed 33 features of a federal audit with a complete of 97 factors of noncompliance, in accordance to The New York Times. The firm handed 56 factors of the audit.

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NTSB official analyzes Alaska Airlines blowout

Investigator-in-Charge John Lovell examines the fuselage plug space of Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 Boeing 737-9 MAX in January. (NTSB / Fox News)

Just final month, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) opened an investigation into Boeing after the corporate voluntarily knowledgeable the company it could not have accomplished required inspections to affirm ample bonding and grounding the place the wings be part of the fuselage on sure 787 Dreamliner airplanes.

The FAA confirmed to Fox Business in an announcement that they’re investigating whether or not Boeing accomplished the inspections and whether or not firm workers falsified plane data.

“As the investigation continues, the FAA will take any necessary action — as always — to ensure the safety of the flying public,” the FAA stated.

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Alaska Boeing 737 Max 9

A plastic sheet covers an space of the fuselage of the Alaska Airlines N704AL Boeing 737 MAX 9 plane exterior a hangar at Portland International Airport on Jan. 8, 2024, in Portland, Ore. (Photo by Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images / Getty Images)

The FAA added that on the similar time, Boeing can also be reinspecting all 787 airplanes nonetheless inside the manufacturing system and should additionally create a plan to tackle the in-service fleet.

Along with a safety disaster that has tarnished the corporate’s repute, Boeing has confronted Senate hearings and carried out a shakeup of its prime administration.

The investigation comes after a number of mishaps involving Boeing aircrafts over the previous few months. 

Ticker Security Last Change Change %
BA THE BOEING CO. 181.25 +0.90 +0.50%

Fox News has tracked at the very least 4 incidents with Boeing aircraft in January, two in February and as many as 10 as of mid-March.

Since then, a wave of points has continued to plague Boeing.

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In a matter of two months, two Boeing whistleblowers — Joshua Dean and John Barnett — died, and in late April, Southwest Airlines introduced it was pulling out of a number of airports as it really works by the monetary fallout from Boeing delays.

In early March, United Airlines introduced it was briefly pausing pilot hiring due to new plane certification and manufacturing delays at Boeing. It additionally lately requested pilots to take unpaid break day as delays persist. 

Also in March, Boeing’s deliveries fell by half and the corporate reported its first quarterly income drop in practically two years.

FOX Business News’ Stephen Sorace and Stepheny Price contributed to this report.



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